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Reviews

  • ‘Cradle’ review: odd, bizarre and ultimately wonderful

    Cradle is a beautifully bizarre experience created by the Ukrainian-based indie game studio Flying Café for Semianimals (its name alone should be an indication of how this strange and creative this game is). Many of the team members have a strong background in the development of the STALKER franchise and you will clearly see the influences. Visually, it has the same desaturated look and a world where and the lines between reality and fantasy are masterfully blurred. It also boasts immersive atmospheric scores that sound like they were written by a Space Cowboy. But most of all, it also has a captivating...

  • ‘A Day In The Woods’ review: a local Little Red Riding Hood puzzler

    Little Red Riding Hood leaped away from the bear and managed to throw a beehive at the hulking beast. The bear roared as the mass flew within inches of its head, narrowly missing it. With a quick swipe, it batted away the object with one paw. The golden-yellow mound landed on the ground with a large thud and cracked open, its contents spilling out. The bear, easily ten times the size of Red, began to devour the hive's honey before the grass had a chance to absorb all of it. This diversion forced the bear to ignore the little girl,...

  • Samsung Gear Circle review: a runner’s delight, a fashionista’s fright

    If you've ever connected earphones to your office laptop or desktop, you probably know all to well the resultant carnage when you accidentally get up still wearing them. In a bid to combat cable-related injuries, a number of wireless earphone products have come into the market in recent months. The Samsung Gear Circle, while not perfect, is one of the more viable options. Like most of its competitors, the Gear Circle uses Bluetooth to communicate with whatever compatible device you choose. It also allows you to listen to music, make and receive phone calls, and perform voice commands on your...

  • Micromax YU Yuphoria review: a future Android One killer

    The YU Yuphoria is the second smartphone offering from Micromax's new sub-brand. It's destined to compete with the likes of the Xiaomi Redmi 2, the 2nd gen. Motorola Moto E, Lenovo A6000, Android One devices, and a bunch of other entry-level smartphones. It offers a metal shell, industry leading hardware specifications, dual-SIM 4G LTE connectivity, and Cyanogen OS powered by Android Lollipop. What more can you ask for as little as US$110, right? Well, more often than not, good hardware specifications don’t result into actual real-world performance in the smartphone industry, so let’s check out how this device performs in...

  • Innerexile Hydra for iPhone 6 review: phone protection made sexy

    There's an old photograph of my parents sitting beneath a tree, as my mother's looking away (probably wishing the damn photo could be taken already) and my dad owning the moment, posing with his oversized mobile phone pouch. The pouch is fastened to his belt but its so incredibly unsubtle its impossible to miss. It is not that my father was trying to show off though -- the early 1990s pouches were simply too big to fit into his pocket. This got me thinking about today's smartphone pouches and protective covers. Cases have undergone a massive redesign from their gigantic designs into...

  • Huawei G7 review: so much phone, so few faults

    Huawei is charging into the South African smartphone market in a big way. According to Reuters, last year the company sold a million units in the country and predicts that this figure will increase two-fold this year. It's not a bad run for a company that, just a few years prior, only worried about telecoms and server racks. Although this figure is largely thanks to its ever improving public perception, thanks to devices like the Huawei Mate 7 and the Huawei P7, its extensive line up of budget devices also cannot and should not be ignored. One of those devices...

  • Braven 705 wireless speaker review: a practical portable Beats beater

    Portability is about as annoying a buzzword as synergy, or smartwatches for that matter. But unlike the latter two, portability has been a fundamental requirement for business people, the tech elite and the not-so-savvy for ages. Remember the netbook? It became popular thanks to its tininess. These 10-inch computers could go anywhere and work practically everywhere without much faff or fuss. Although the netbook is well and truly dead, this notion lives on in other guises of technology. Portable speakers is a good example. Recently, we've seen the likes of Harmon's JBL brand, Beats By Dre's Pill range and cheaper...

  • ‘SpeedLink Decus’ gaming mouse review: a budget extravaganza

    Gamers usually buy the best gaming mouse money can buy, or at least one they can afford. The device needs to at least be responsive, have mappable buttons, and adjustable DPI speeds. SpeedLink has been around for over a year now in the South African market, but has yet to make a full forced impact in it. With a budget mouse like the Decus, they may just have a chance. The Decus is the high-end of SpeedLink’s gaming mouse spectrum. It is touted as a professional gaming mouse with ultimate ergonomics. Locally, the mouse is priced at a sweet R699....

  • GEKKOPOD review: a flexible, funky smartphone mount

    There are numerous tripod solutions available for smartphones and digital cameras; some of them good, some of them bad. How many mounts can wrap around a tree branch while holding a camera? The GEKKOPOD can. Funded on Kickstarter in under twelve hours, GEKKOPOD is the brainchild of Zuckerim, a Jerusalem-based company. The device has been developed for smartphone and camera users alike looking for a more flexible tripod solution. There are two features setting GEKKOPOD apart from its competition: its flexible legs and lizard-like feet. At first glance, the device appears to portray some sort of cheap gimmick, or something you'd...

  • Logitech G502 Proteus Core review: heads and tails above the rest

    It's really difficult telling gaming mice apart nowadays. All feature highly adjustable DPI or sensitivity settings. All are somewhat colourful and snazzy with splashes of style littering their compact bodies. All mostly arrive with adjustable software packages, allowing the user to adjust the mouse according to games installed or personal preferences. With that said, how the hell do we tell the difference? Believe it or not, but in a world of copy-cat devices it's probably easier than any other field to spot differences. Logitech's G502 Proteus Core continues the German company's Titan naming system but also its legendary build quality. Taking a...