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Reviews

  • ‘SpeedLink Decus’ gaming mouse review: a budget extravaganza

    Gamers usually buy the best gaming mouse money can buy, or at least one they can afford. The device needs to at least be responsive, have mappable buttons, and adjustable DPI speeds. SpeedLink has been around for over a year now in the South African market, but has yet to make a full forced impact in it. With a budget mouse like the Decus, they may just have a chance. The Decus is the high-end of SpeedLink’s gaming mouse spectrum. It is touted as a professional gaming mouse with ultimate ergonomics. Locally, the mouse is priced at a sweet R699....

  • GEKKOPOD review: a flexible, funky smartphone mount

    There are numerous tripod solutions available for smartphones and digital cameras; some of them good, some of them bad. How many mounts can wrap around a tree branch while holding a camera? The GEKKOPOD can. Funded on Kickstarter in under twelve hours, GEKKOPOD is the brainchild of Zuckerim, a Jerusalem-based company. The device has been developed for smartphone and camera users alike looking for a more flexible tripod solution. There are two features setting GEKKOPOD apart from its competition: its flexible legs and lizard-like feet. At first glance, the device appears to portray some sort of cheap gimmick, or something you'd...

  • Logitech G502 Proteus Core review: heads and tails above the rest

    It's really difficult telling gaming mice apart nowadays. All feature highly adjustable DPI or sensitivity settings. All are somewhat colourful and snazzy with splashes of style littering their compact bodies. All mostly arrive with adjustable software packages, allowing the user to adjust the mouse according to games installed or personal preferences. With that said, how the hell do we tell the difference? Believe it or not, but in a world of copy-cat devices it's probably easier than any other field to spot differences. Logitech's G502 Proteus Core continues the German company's Titan naming system but also its legendary build quality. Taking a...

  • ‘Ryse: Son of Rome’ review: Veni, vidi, fail

    It's difficult to gauge launch titles for new gaming consoles. Sure, these titles are supposed to show off what the console is capable of, but at the same time the developers haven't fully 'unlocked' the system and all of its potential. Ryse: Son of Rome was a launch title of the Xbox One, a year and a half later we see if it still rises to the challenge. Developed by Crytek, the studio behind the original Far Cry and the Crysis series, Ryse is their first foray into a more historical title. I use the word historical in the lightest...

  • ‘Splatoon’ review: a Nintendo multiplayer without Mario

    There are two things you wouldn't normally associate with Nintendo: new IPs not featuring that mustachioed Italian plumber, and angry shooters. Without so much as a warning toot at E3 2014, the company announced Splatoon, a game that is the strangest embodiment of both. Needless to say, people were fairly excited. And they had every right to be. While serious shooters like Halo, Call of Duty and the endless number of Tom Clancy inspired titles rule the blue and green consoles, Splatoon does things quite differently over on the Wii U. It's not as serious as other shooters we've seen. Hell,...

  • TomTom Runner Cardio review: it’s all in the wrist

    The TomTom Runner Cardio came to me at exactly the wrong time. You see, I usually run around four times a week, with a race frequently thrown into the mix. A combination of overseas travel and a chest infection (brought on by said overseas travel) meant that's how many times in total I was able to run during the review period. Still, I put it through its paces as best I could and, for the most part, the future looks pretty bright for performance wearables. Before we get into the review proper though, a little background: a couple of years...

  • ‘Kirby and the Rainbow Paintbrush’ review: the Wii U’s most beautiful platformer, ever

    The Nintendo Wii U is a strange, strange machine that I still haven't really gotten to grips with yet. But for all its faff and fumble, it does have a few dynamite games. And by dynamite I mean small packages exploding into hugely expansive, absorbing and entertaining romps through the realms of Nintendoland. Although Nintendo has a habit of rehashing old titles, making a living off its legacy characters, it does produce a few beautiful gems once in a while. With that said, it's safe to say that Kirby and the Rainbow Paintbrush is one of those memorable few. Look, a...

  • ‘Code Name: STEAM’ review: Steampunk chess

    I've never been one for turn-based combat. Sure, in some games that require the mental agility of a well-read grasshopper, it can be a hoot but most of the time, these games are slow and laborious. In a world where instant gratification often outweights hard grafting, it's easy to pan a game that doesn't really give you what you want when you want it, but Code Name: STEAM (stylised as S.T.E.A.M.) is a bit of a mixed bag really. On the one hand, you have a rather charming Steampunk-inspired romp through a world ravaged by aliens coloured within comic book framework,...

  • ‘Lara Croft: Relic Run’ review: tomb raiding your wallet

    Most of us are suckers for punishment. No, what I mean is most of us have enjoyed at least one freemium game, whether it be a social farmer or a dumbed-down city-planner. And hey, maybe you’ve sunk a bit of cash into one. I’ll raise my hand and say I have; I don’t remember what it was, but I remember feeling dirty afterwards. I’ve paid for freemium content. Square Enix decided to cash-in once more on this model and gave us Lara Croft: Relic Run. It’s an endless runner based off of the old Lara. But is raiding tombs really...

  • Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge review-in-brief: the edge of reason

    A few weeks back, we received the Samsung Galaxy S6 in all its sparkling glass and gunmetal glory. It was an instant visual hit with the office, and while it wasn't too flash it harboured just enough flair to (dare I say it) outshine the iPhone 6. But that's where Samsung should've stopped. The notion of curving a device's face by shoving a slanted screen on it and releasing it to market is a bold, bold move, especially when consumers are not always ready to take such a huge leap of faith. While it was clear that the company needed to...