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Reviews

  • Garmin Vivosmart HR review: acute fitness tracking for a price

    American company Garmin isn't a stranger to tracking technologies, be it mapping tech or sport science, so when the Vivosmart HR arrived on my desk, I was pretty excited. It's the company's new fitness tracker for the semi-serious outdoor performer, and unlike the standard Garmin Vivosmart, the HR has a heart rate tracker (I'm sure you figured that out by its name). But at R4299, it's not the cheapest fitness tracker on the market, and not even close to the cheapest with a heart rate monitor, like the Fitbit Charge HR. So why should anyone drop this amount of cash on...

  • Fujifilm XT10 review: analogue aesthetic meets modern muscle

    The Fujifilm XT10 is one of the best mirrorless cameras in the market right now. Released in 2015, after the release of the Fujifilm XT1, its functionality, old-style design and size are without much fault. There are issues with the design, that is namely in terms of button spacing from each other, but this is largely a problem only those with enormous hands will face. Often my thumb accidentally bumped buttons whilst trying to get a good grip on the camera, but once my thumb knew where to rest, this was not an issue. Fujifilm XT10: petite sibling of XT1 The XT10...

  • Thule Gauntlet 3.0 Attache review: more than just a MacBook tote

    Airlines are clamping down on carry-on luggage with their "slimline laptop bag" laws, and while some love their good ol' backpacks using that as carry on, others with smaller laptops and tablets are opting for smaller cases and getting away with two bags on board. This was partly my testing methodology for the Thule Gauntlet. At 13.0-inches, it's meant to fit an Apple MacBook Pro in said form factor, but I didn't have one on hand. Besides, I imagine that Thule would encourage other laptop brand owners to use the Gauntlet (even if its marketing is squarely aimed at Cupertino...

  • Is the R2000 Samsung Gear VR worth buying?

    Virtual reality has been around for ages, but the current wave of VR is nothing like the efforts of years gone by. Instead, we have elaborate graphics, sharp displays and proper head-tracking in place, nothing like the Virtual Boy of yore. And you don't need to spend US$600 on an Oculus Rift or US$800 for the HTC Vive to get a taste either, because there are cheaper experiences around, such as the Samsung Gear VR. Featuring a R1500-R2000 price tag depending on the retailer, the Gear VR manages to occupy a pleasant price/performance middle-ground in theory. It's not as expensive or quite as capable...

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge review: meaningful evolution

    Unarguably the most popular high-end Android phone of the year, the Samsung Galaxy S7 is pretty much guaranteed to sell by the bucket load. On paper, this year's edition looks like the equivalent of an "iPhone Xs"; that is, it's an evolution of last year's design as opposed to an all-new approach to the formula. Are the phones worthy of a purchase though or did Samsung just play it too safe? Design You'd be hard-pressed to tell the difference between this phone and the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge, which is fine because the S6 Edge featured a rather pleasant design. Boasting that glass back,...

  • Reviewing The Classics: we play Duke Nukem 3D (1996)

    Stand by for retro reviews done right, folks. Reviewing The Classics is a series where Gearburn staff play some of their most loved retro games from bygone consoles and PCs with floppy drives. This week, Wiehahn has a look at the deliciously brutish Duke Nukem 3D, an iconic first person shooter that taught us all about cheesy one-liners and kicking alien ass. Hail to the King Baby! To start this review off, I have to note that I'm struggling to contain the deep wells of nostalgia that I have for this title. Duke Nukem 3D was as much a part...

  • Yo-Kai Watch review: a charming, gorgeous delight

    Japanese developer Level-5 has been creating exceptional JRPG titles since the PlayStation 2 era. Its range of games always carries a distinct charm to them. This effort has been brought over into its full-blown foray of the collect-em-all series of JRPGs, popularised by Pokemon. Yo-Kai Watch is a game you might want to start pre-ordering. The game is set in a lush fictional city complete with different districts and shopping areas. You’ll choose between either a boy or a girl as your character; neither choice will impact the game, but only some limited dialogue. You character -- I called mine...

  • Trine 3: The Artifacts of Power review: colourful puzzling

    I've been through a load of "serious" games of late, which left me sweaty running from zombies, shooting things in the face while skydiving through space and time, and picking up as many radioactive coffee mugs as I can find. So when developer Frozenbyte decided to bring Trine 3: The Artifacts of Power to the PlayStation 4, I took damn good notice, and sighed at the thought of playing a light-hearted puzzler for a change. Don't get me wrong, just because it's a bit more whimsical than recent titles doesn't mean that it's not for the so-called "hardcore gamer." For those who...

  • MXGP2 review: I heard you like mud

    Some people enjoy playing polo on Sunday afternoons, while others fancy crackers and croquet on quiet country lawns. Others on the other hand, love face-diving into a puddle of mud after falling from a spluttering two wheeled demon. Yes, off-road motorcycling, motorcross, or MotoX, isn't everyone's cup of tea, but that didn't stop Milestone from developing MXGP2 -- the "Official Motocross Video Game." That subtitle really shows the acute target audience this game would normally attract, but Milestone hopes to catch a few casual gamers' eyes too. But will it? To answer that, I probably need to explain what this game's...

  • Between Me And The Night review: lucid dreaming

    Between Me and the Night is Lisbon-based indie studio, Raindance LX’s, first released title and I must admit that I was quite impressed with their surrealistic point-and-click adventure. Although the game is not without its downfalls, it successfully delves into some deep and sometimes unnerving narrative themes, and with a depth I seldom experience in AAA titles. Personally, it is another testament that indie developers are the pioneers that will discover the future landscapes of gaming. Between Me and the Night might not be perfect but it does make me incredibly excited to see what these developers will do next. Story...