• BURN MEDIA
    • Memeburn
      Tech-savvy insight and analysis
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Motorburn
      Because cars are gadgets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!
  • PS4 teaser video gives us first glimpse of console

    Embedded below are the first shots of the PS4 console, care of Sony’s official YouTube page. The video gives us snippets of the hardware and we can at least confirm that it’s going to be black. And square-ish. The video has loads of information about the console, but the images speed by too quickly to make any real sense. We slowed it down though, and picked apart the video. What we came away with was surprisingly: almost nothing. Pausing the video reveals details about the ventilation system, eject key and overall design of the PS4, but nothing concrete as...

  • LG announces ‘flexible and unbreakable’ OLED panel

    LG’s making a massive splash this week as it’s unveiling a 5-inch flexible OLED panel at the SID Event. This comes together with a handful of other major announcements to be expected at the event. Flexible display technology has been on Gearburn’s radar for quite some time now. Yes, this technology would make an awesome party trick. More importantly though, it would become a welcome feature, hopefully replacing our current market of fragile mobile displays. Not only are flexible displays gimmicks companies like to measure egos with at annual tech events– they’re for all intents and purposes (as LG claims)...

  • Samsung to showcase groundbreaking high-res display

    This week, Samsung’s exhibiting a 10.1-inch 2560×1600 display for tablets as well as a 13.3-inch 3200×1800 effort for notebooks. These will be featured, among many other state-of-the-art display technologies, at the SID (Society for Information Display) Event. Not only are these resolutions eye-bleedingly sharp, they also offer 30% power-savings compared to current LCDs. If these prototypes hit the market as notebook or tablet displays now, they will simply blow competition out of the water. As mentioned by The Verge, this is in direct competition with Apple’s Retina and Google’s Pixel displays. The 13.3-inch Retina’s display comes in at a...

  • Japan-exclusive Sony Xperia UL coming 25 May

    The Japan-only Sony Xperia UL is coming. Sony’s stab at a version of the Xperia Z for the Japanese market is markedly thicker with a Xperia UL-exclusive 15-shot burst mode. Outside of this it’s practically the same lovable, huggable piece of 5-inch class from Xperia. But wait, there’s more: Xperia’s UL has a Snapdragon 600 CPU, which a slight bump from the quad-core Qualcomm 1.5Ghz processor as seen in the Xperia Z. The camera is also slightly better (according to the information supplied by Sony) thanks to the increase in CPU power. Both the UL and Z have a 13.1-megapixel...

  • Jolla smartphone goes from hype to hardware, sells for $513

    Jolla’s here. From rumours to Jolla Oy’s first ever smartphone, the ex-Nokia N9 team (made up of Finnish “directors and core professionals”) have come a long way indeed. And for €399, the Jolla can be yours when it’s eventually released Q4 2013. Its main draw (besides it being a non-Nokia, Samsung, BlackBerry or iPhone) is that it runs Sailfish OS, the successor to Meego, the lightweight mobile operating system last seen running Nokia’s N9. Why the Meego-based Sailfish UI though? Jussi Hurmola, one of Jolla’s founders, says it’s about introducing something brand new. “UI is a major thing and one of...

  • No Android update at Google I/O and that’s perfectly okay

    Google’s yearly I/O, a conference aimed at developers saw its keynote on May 15 and surprisingly, there was no major Android update — and I’m okay with that. Sure, that’s what I say now, but I am a little disappointed, because everyone loves a fresh OS. However, I completely understand why Google didn’t update its mobile OS this time around. As I see it there are five main factors contributing to the lack of Android update. Fragmentation First, give the general Android user some time to catch up. For years people have complained about how fragmented Android is, with some people still...

  • Here’s how Google wants you to ‘void your warranty’ and hack Google Glass

    At Google I/O 2013, the search company showed off its wearable PC/hipster accessory Google Glass and it’s potential for hacking. In a video called “Google I/O 2013 – Voiding Your Warranty: Hacking Glass”, two Google employees guide developers through the steps it takes to hack into Glass and bend it to your evil ways, if you’re a mad scientist or disgruntled Microsoft employee. We suppose Google Glass can be hacked for good as well, as demonstrated by this impressive facial recognition hack. Google’s a hack-happy company, being open-source and all. But it’s a cautious tale, as the video warns...

  • Razer unveils the Atrox, an arcade stick for serious modders

    Younger gamers might not know this, but there was a time when most people played in arcades, not on consoles in their lounges. Razer’s newest outing, the Atrox looks to be one of the coolest attempts to bring that arcade feel to your lounge we’ve yet seen. The Xbox 360 controller is ideally suited to fighter games and should bring joy to the faces of button mashers everywhere, especially because it features swappable parts. If that sounds a little scary, don’t panic. It looks like Razer’s tried to take care of all levels of modders with the Atrox. That means...

  • World’s first fully-automated flight takes off

    Here’s something for you end-of-the-world Terminator prophets to latch on to. This week we have seen some wonderful breakthroughs for flying robots. It’s terribly exciting stuff though, whether you’re a Schwarzenegger  fanboy or not. Firstly, there was the virgin flight of an unmanned aircraft being launched off an aircraft carrier by the US. Then, shortly after, we heard that the British announced a plane that safely carried passengers for about 500 miles done almost entirely autonomously. Pilots have been doing automated landings since the late fifties and early sixties. Now though, technological breakthroughs enable flights to require even less human interaction. The...

  • 12 classic gadgets that will leave you feeling nostalgic

    With additional reporting by Steven Norris For those of us who grew up in the 80s and 90s, it’s sometimes difficult to look back at the gadgets that were hailed as so cutting edge when we were children without thinking, “Holy crap did I really carry that around in my pocket?” Our smartphones, our consoles, our televisions, everything we use today is so much sleeker, slimmer, smarter, that it’s difficult to believe that once upon a time, we used to get by without them. And so here is a list. Of awesome, clunky, old-fashioned gadgets that I loved. Once upon a time.