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  • Watch Dogs review: now you see me

    This is what we've waited for: the next generation of gaming. Watch Dogs is here and it's an insanely addictive and imaginative game that will hook its digital claws into you for weeks. During the 30-40 hours of main campaign gaming (which I'm so very close to finishing), Watch Dogs twists and turns with loads of genuinely interesting human drama and neat ideas like, why hasn't anyone thought of this before? An open world like GTA V but with control instead of chaos.  This is a deluxe open world game ripe for the picking which makes you feel increasingly god-like each step of the...

  • LG G3 photos and specs accidentally leaked by LG itself

    Tomorrow is the official launch day of the LG G3. So why then has the company decided to publish all photos and specifications a day before? LG Netherlands are the offending leakers and have taken the page down, but not before Android Authority managed to pull all the details we've listed below: 5.5" display 2560×1440 resolution 2GB RAM 16GB internal memory (no other sizes were mentioned but there could be other models) Snapdragon 801 CPU 13MP OIS camera A-GPS with Glonass Bluetooth 4.0 Android 4.4 Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac 3000mAh battery Dimension of 46.3x74.7x8.9mm And the greatest mystery of the LG G3, a black dot...

  • Cryogenic human trials kick off, but no missions to Mars yet

    Folks, doctors have figured out how to prolong the limbo between life and death. Meaning, suspended animation may no longer be an enigma reserved for cheesy sci-fi films and the far-flung future. Last month marked the beginning of the first ever ‘emergency preservation and resuscitation’ trial, which is looking at suspending life for a few hours in life-threatening trauma cases. By halting life temporarily, surgeons are given more time to fix fatal wounds before resuscitation. Although life will clinically stop and (hopefully) restart for the patients in this trial, surgeons are refraining from dubbing the procedure...

  • Apple’s smart, sassy home of the future could be revealed at WWDC

    Apple will soon reveal its bid to take over your home, according to a new report by the Financial Times. The Cupertino-based company is preparing its connected smart home platform for a big unveiling at WWDC, which takes place next week. Connected homes see devices fitted with internet connectivity, granting users control of their surroundings using phones and computers. This notion isn't too far from the future either as there have been a spate of connected appliances released this year. Think of The Jetsons and you may be imagining the near future. Apple's platform will aim to do the same, allowing...

  • HTC One M8 review: old name, new tricks

    HTC One was one of the most beautiful and sought-after smartphones from last year which taught us to focus on overall experience more than the hardware specifications. HTC tried to break the norms with an UltraPixel camera and BoomSound speakers. HTC One M8 has been recently released as a successor to the HTC One but does it provide enough to be considered a worthy upgrade? Let’s find out. Unrivalled looks HTC has always been the only brand which could challenge Apple in terms of product design. Most of the time, it even wins these battles. HTC has still decided to place the power...

  • Solar Roadways pave the future with clean, free energy

    Solar Roadways, a company that intends to pave our roads with solar panels, recently surpassed its massive funding goal of US$1-million on Indiegogo. In theory, these solar panels, invented by Scott Brusaw and his wife Julie, give us alternative sources of clean energy and safer means of transport. Traditional roads are primarily made up of asphalt which is annoyingly outdated. They cave in and create potholes, get covered in snow and skid your car. They also don't light up when you drive on them. How lame. Solar Roadways' solution is meant to change all of that. Its solar panels can withstand...

  • Meet VoCore, the smallest Linux computer yet

    There have been more than a few tiny computing boards released in the past few years, and this trend won't be slowing down any time soon. So meet VoCore, which is quite possibly one of the smallest Linux computers ever made. The tiny coin-sized board is kitted with 32MB SDRAM, 8MB SPI flash memory and a system-on-chip clocked at 360MHz. It features no video-out or GPU, so don't expect to turn it into a retro-gaming station or home theatre PC. Although sluggish compared to a Raspberry Pi, versatility, portability and low wattage is the VoCore's real aim. But its secret weapon...

  • Tiny hairy metals threaten technology, but science holds the solution

    The formation of minute whiskers on many of the metals widely used in electronics has plagued the industry for decades. The hair-like protrusions formed by these whiskers pose a serious problem for long-term use, virtually compromising the life-span of many essential and expensive technologies. Over time, the whiskers allow for current leakage and subsequent short-circuits, often resulting in irreparable damage. In the past 60 years, this damage has amounted to billions of dollars wasted in the auto, aviation, and space industries. Don’t fret, a professor at the University of Toledo, Ohio, has finally provided a theory to detail the formation...

  • Why Google Glass is destined to fail

    "Can technology be something that frees us up and keeps us in the moment, rather than taking us out of it? Can it help us look up and out at the world around us, and the people who share it with us?" These were questions posed by the new Google Glass chief Ivy Ross in an open Google Plus letter this past week. She however failed to answer them in the same breath, simply remarking that "no one has really tried to answer them with a product like this before." There are good reasons for this. I'll give credit where it's...

  • Mad scientist’s magnetic shoes unlock his inner Magneto

    Colin Furze is playing superhero again and this time, he's strapping on some massively powerful microwave magnets to sneakers that allow him to walk on the ceiling. Previously, the mad scientist created his (much better) version of Wolverine's claws that ejected and retracted thanks to an ingenious use of air pressure. Not only that, they sparked and sliced through watermelon. Now setting his sights on Magneto's magnetism or Spiderman's wall-crawling abilities, Furze has outdone logic itself by walking all over the ceiling of his shed without the help of CGI, or adamantium or radioactive spiders. Incredibly, Furze notes that creating the shoes was the...