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Panasonic Lumix GF6 hands on review: beginner friendly

Panasonic is known for quickly refreshing its cameras lineup, especially those at the budget end of the range. The GF series, which is the company’s beginner option, was last upgraded roughly 12 months ago, so it’s no surprise to see the replacement Panasonic GF6 making an appearance now.

However, Panasonic says that although the GF1 was incredibly popular, the GF series hasn’t seen the same level of popularity with the GF3 and GF5. Perhaps this is due to increased competition both within the company – from the likes of the Panasonic GX1 – and outside it, with more companies now entering the compact system camera (CSC) market.

On the other hand, perhaps it’s because the GF line never really found its audience, being a little too simple for the more advanced photographer, and too complicated for those stepping up from a compact camera.

Panasonic Lumix GF6 review

Panasonic has therefore given the new Lumix GF6 a more complete overhaul than previous upgrades.

It now includes a 16 million pixel sensor, the same device as found in the Panasonic GX1. The GX1 is scheduled to carry on for the foreseeable future, which may be a disappointment to those who expected to see a replacement by now.

Along with the sensor is a brand new Venus engine, and most noticeably a new tilting 180-degree touchscreen and a mode dial on the top of the camera.

Panasonic Lumix GF6 review

The Panasonic GF6 includes inbuilt Wi-Fi technology, something that only the high-end GH series had featured previously. Furthermore, it is the very first interchangeable lens camera to include Near Field Communications (NFC) – a technology that looks set to be making an appearance on more devices in the next few months.

This is the same technology that you currently find in contactless payment systems and in several smartphones and tablets (Apple is conspicuous by its absence). It enables you to touch two devices together to instantly share images/videos, without the need to add in passwords or other laborious means.

Keen to appeal to the beginner audience, the camera includes even more digital filters than before. These are likely to find favour with the Instagram crowd, boosting the GF6’s offering up to 19 different effects.

Panasonic Lumix GF6 review

Interestingly, these filters are now also available on Creative Panorama shooting mode – a feature that first made its appearance on Panasonic’s latest set of compacts, and now finds its way onto its compact system cameras.

A new retouch function enables you to do some editing-in camera, with the ability to remove distracting elements such as branches or strangers in the background.

All of these improvements don’t come at a price premium, launching at £449 (around US$680 / AU$652) with the new 14-42mm kit lens. This is significantly cheaper than the £579 / US$749 / AU$849 asking price that the Panasonic GF5 launched with, although it’s worth pointing out that the standard kit lens included here is not a power zoom, but instead a new manual zoom option.

Panasonic Lumix GF6 review


This article by Amy Davies originally appeared on Techradar, a Burn Media publishing partner.

  • I’m surprised anybody has anything to say about the so-called banking spat. IMHO it is childish and clearly demonstrates how out of touch our banking friends are with the real world for the following reasons:
    1. Nobody believes banking advertising to start with, i.e. for the most part, they turn half-truths into whole lies!  2. Banks should rather be looking to reduce their bank charges and improve their levels of service. 3. Most of the big banks are the same – big on promise, short on service and delivery. They live under illusion that they are building brands. I have banked with them all, both in a business and private capacity and can’t say any of them come close to looking after you and your interests … unless of course you have pots of money!

     

  • Standard Bank are losers. I can say that because I ended 30 years of banking with them last year.  I’ve owned 3 properties and Standard Bank couldn’t care less about giving me a competive intererest rate for my bond.  FNB have been more than willing.  I switched to FNB and never looked back.

    Everything about Standard Bank is a fail:  You PAY for your sms notifications but they get sent long after the transaction has taken place.  They have not concept like eBucks.   They had SAA voyager miles but they then switched to BA.

    Standard Bank closed down the one and only branch in the GreenPoint, V&A waterfront area.  Clearly they don’t need these well off customers.

    FNB are on the cutting edge of technology:   Fantastic mobile banking application, SMS notificatios that get sent before you can put your card back into your wallet.  Paypal integration, Facebook integration and more.

  • MWSader

    This article was a great read.Thanks.

  • My personal bad experience with Standard bank was when a certain loan shark in Durban could somehow clone my card and made R1000 worth of balance enquiries on my card over a period of 3 weeks when I had trouble getting paid via an employment agency in 2003.. and a month later I square the R1000 up with the bank and they still declined my overdraft application.. 

    But here’s a tip for you Standard Bank.. maybe this will help you in trying to catch up with FNB.. (don’t say you heard this from me)

    RB Jacobs is actually 12 different people.

  • My personal bad experience with Standard bank was when a certain loan shark in Durban could somehow clone my card and made R1000 worth of balance enquiries on my card over a period of 3 weeks when I had trouble getting paid via an employment agency in 2003.. and a month later I square the R1000 up with the bank and they still declined my overdraft application.. 

    But here’s a tip for you Standard Bank.. maybe this will help you in trying to catch up with FNB.. (don’t say you heard this from me)

    RB Jacobs is actually 12 different people.

  • Sharing

    Where do you get it that FNB have fixed fee’s for transactions ?- The article looks like you getting paid to sing these praises. Theirs fees are as confusing as the rest of the big banks. Capitec Bank is the only one that’s really straight forward.

  • About that first point. FNB says they have an iPhone app and they do.. and it works too. They said they’re giving away iPad2 tablets and they do. The waiting list may be long but people are getting their iPads. Not all banks’ ads are lies. And I am a keen critic of advertising myself.

  • Greg

    I am a FNB customer. There is not much truth in their advertising. That is a fact!! The 15% e-bucks on fuel spend is the biggest farce that ever existed in banking.  Customer service in their branches is not good. Their staff are not trained/knowledgeable on the products, the benefits of the products or the requirements to achieve the benefits.

  • Tony – I believe that we have to separate the issues. 

    Is it relevant that Standard Bank used twitter and their blog to make the announcement of taking on the FNB advertising – I don’t believe its even slightly relevant – the conversation is the conversation and it will move over platforms. 

    To express a personal opinion I have never found the ASA effective and complaints by competitors is always for me a little petty. I think this reaction was more about the pettiness – really Standard just get on with it – if you have a better service the public will soon find out and tell their friends – focus on the delivery experience is the message.

    In fact I think the Standard Bank did a pretty good job in not enflaming the conversation, so much so that 88% of the conversation was centred on FNB and of that conversation 66% expressed a neutral sentiment and 20% a negative sentiment towards FNB which leaves only 12% positive in any way. Of the entire conversation Standard Bank was the centre of only 12% of it – half were negative comments but that is only 6% of the total comments.

    I don’t think that this is a social media story (go read my post in BizCommunity today) this is about trust in advertising – we just expect advertisers to lie so we discount it and enjoy the entertainment. 

    For me what is significant is although people went against Standard they didn’t really support FNB either. Data was provided me courtesy of Brandseye and verified using their new crowd sourced system.

  • Sheena Gates

    Just one little thing to point out – I don’t believe that FNB was as mature as they should’ve been.  RB Jacobs’ responses on Twitter were more outrageously arrogant than that of Standard Bank’s public whining!

  • Blesaidos

    The truth is, we like these banks for different reasons, that make the argument complex.

  • Blesaidos

    I have my own bad experience with FNB, I’m a foreigner, with 5 years work permit but the only service that I could get from FNB is receiving my salary through their bank, nothing else. I was told that i cannot apply for credit card, loan, overdraft……. Standard offers all these, that’s why I left FNB.

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