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All posts by Wiehahn Diederichs: Columnist

Wiehahn Diederichs: Columnist
Capetonian freelance writer and photographer. Wiehahn is a lover of stories in all their forms, and has been an avid gamer since he took his first breath. If he is not working or gaming, he either pours his creative energy into his passion for music or plays foosball in some bar.
  • Your September gaming news roundup

    After multiple reconnaissance missions, back-alley bribes, and a string of other unmentionable activities, we've managed to acquire all gaming intelligence that took place within the month of September 2017. The list that follows contains all information our Lord Editor has deemed fit for public consumption. If you feel there is something that needs to be addressed or lacking from this list, please let us know in the comments section below and we’ll be sure to deal with you… I mean, your issues. SAG-AFTRA strike reaches conclusion For the past year, voice-actors of the Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists...

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm, Episode 1 review: hella origins

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm leaves behind the supernatural elements of its predecessor and delves deeper into the mysterious and perplexing realm of adolescence, a time when every emotion and experience is amplified by the naïveté and entitlement of youth. It personifies the emotions we have unofficially declared as taboo, and allows us to wear it as a badge of honour. Although a handful of games deal with similar subject matter, it's more often than not decorated in some extravagant dressing. The recently released Hellblade explores the extremities of mental illness, but you're still a badass Viking demon slayer....

  • Your SA Game Jam 2017 winners

    As some of you may know, local Cape Town game devs, Free Lives (Broforce, Genital Jousting) hosted and sponsored the second annual “SA GAME JAM” from 1-4 September. For those of you who are not familiar with game jams, it is an event where game developers, be it aspiring or established, are challenged to create a game around a certain theme and within a specific time limit. The SA Game Jam 2017 gave its participants between 48 and 72 hours to develop a game around the theme of "collections". Now, this might seem like quite a standard practice in the world...

  • Here’s your gaming news roundup for August 2017

    After multiple reconnaissance missions, back-alley bribes, and a string of other unmentionable activities, we've managed to acquire all gaming intelligence that took place within the month of August 2017. The list that follows contains all information our Lord Editor has deemed fit for public consumption. If you feel there is something that needs to be addressed or lacking from this list, please let us know in the comments section below and we'll be sure to deal with you… I mean, your issues. The Long Dark gets film adaptation Hinterland studios, the developers behind The Long Dark, and Jeremy Bolt, the producer behind...

  • Darkside Detective review: you’ll want to play this

    Darkside Detective is a point-and-click adventure game developed by the Ireland-based five-man indie studio, Spooky Doorway. Although it is the first title to come from the new indie studio, the team boasts an impressive collective experience, sporting the likes of artist Paul Conway, who worked on franchises such as The Sims and composer Ben Prunty, best known for his work on FTL: Faster Than Light. Darkside Detective follows the adventures of the sharp-witted Detective Francis McQueen and his partner, the utterly clueless but equally loveable Officer Dooley. They are the only two members of the heavily under-funded and under-appreciated Twin Falls...

  • Tacoma review: time is oxygen…

    Tacoma is a sci-fi narrative-exploration game developed by Fullbright, the same Portland-based indie studio that brought us Gone Home, one of the very titles that started the trend of this genre. Tacoma is a considerably more ambitious title than Gone Home. Jumping from one voice actor and a 90s American Home to a cast of seven on-board a floating space station in the year 2088, the Fullbright team have definitely gone for a much larger experience. But now the question begs: is this for the better? At first, I didn’t like this new approach. I was a massive fan of Gone...

  • Q&A: the devs behind intriguing SA indie game Jetstream

    Last week I had the pleasure of attending Cape Town's Electronic and Gaming Expo (EGE) 2017, the third running of the local gaming event. I had unforgivably missed last year's EGE and seeing the incredible growth between the event's first and latest iteration was quite astonishing. As I fought my way through the sea of attendees, employing a sequence of judo chops and roundhouse kicks, I eventually found my way to the stand of IESA (Interactive Entertainment South Africa), which boasted a selection of locally developed games. One title that caught my attention was Jetstream, an incredibly addictive puzzle game currently...

  • Your gaming news roundup for July 2017

    After multiple reconnaissance missions, back-alley bribes, and a string of other unmentionable activities, we've managed to acquire all gaming intelligence that took place within the month of July 2017. The list that follows contains all information our Lord Editor has deemed fit for public consumption. If you feel there is something that needs to be addressed or lacking from this list, please let us know in the comments section below and we'll be sure to deal with you- your problem. GORN by Free Lives makes its way to early access Cape Town development studio Free Lives (Broforce, Genital Jousting) has added to their...

  • Wiehahn’s best games of 2017 thus far

    The passing of time is an inevitable trait of life. It feels like just yesterday I was recovering from the life-sapping hangover that so often follows New Year’s Eve. And then I blinked. Now we’ve past the halfway mark of 2017 and the months are falling off the calendar as fast as ever. So before we blink again and suddenly we’re seventy years old, trying to remember where we left our false teeth, let's take a few moments to relax and review the first half of this year. So far, 2017 has provided us with a plethora of unique gaming titles,...

  • Better Late Than Never: Thimbleweed Park and The Final Station reviewed

    It’s Better Late Than Never time again, the review series that takes a look at the gaming titles we have unforgivably overlooked in recent months. In this instalment we will be looking at two mystery-ridden, pixel art titles: the pleasingly bizarre retro-inspired point-and- click adventure, Thimbleweed Park, and the dark and unforgiving 2D-sidescroller, The Final Station. Thimbleweed Park If you've ever played any of the old-school Sierra or LucasArts point-and-click adventure games, then you will feel right at home in Thimbleweed Park. This game does not only blatantly and shamelessly draw its inspiration from these titles, but its characters often openly, and...