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  • BlackBerry goes shopping for video skillz

    Research in Motion has acquired a small video editing startup called JayCut. The seven man Swedish team has been developing a Web-based video editing suite for the past few years – free to use for casual users, with the technology also being licensed to other companies. The reason for the acquisition seems to be RIM's fixation on making the BlackBerry Playbook more consumer-competitive against the iPad. RIM has faced a barrage of criticism of the PlayBook, with weak sales requiring a sharp knife be taken to forecasts. Chief amongst the kibitzing has been the slow growth of available apps for...

  • Drool over the new Mac goodness

    Apple has got the wind behind it -- its just launched a slew of new products, many if not all absolutely drool-worthy, and also exceeded Wall Street expectations by announcing yet another record quarter of US$7.31-billion in profits and gross margins of over 40%. Gearburn takes a look at some of the products which have recently slammed their way onto every Mac fan's wishlist. The latest version of OS X came roaring out, although much of the sound and fury was that of a paper tiger. The operating system (which anyone that knows anything...

  • Loot? Hello! Dungeon Siege 3! I want my loot!

    Review: Dungeon Siege 3. Since my school days, I've a secret guilty pleasure in staying home on rainy winter Saturday nights to hack-n-slash my way through hordes of evil baddies, collecting treasure upon treasure. The game that started all that? Diablo. It had everything - graphics, storyline and, most importantly, a never-ending stream of loot. Many a happy weekend was spent crawling dungeons, looking for a fight with Baal and then having an epic throw-down where I cast his scaly red ass back to the pit from whence he came. As much as I wish it was, this is not...

  • Video Review: Moshi Moshi Curve

    Video Review: Native Union Moshi Moshi. There are many reasons to desire something. Form. Function. Status. The fact that it makes your desk look hot, and makes you look hotter when using it. The Moshi Moshi telephone handsets are a whole new class of cellphone accessory: designed to be bigger, heavier and less function-rich than the thing they connect to. It does very little apart from what it says on the box - it's a mobile headset that's phone-sized. You hold it in your hand and talk into it like a top-flight exec from Mad Men. You can be strong...

  • Samsung unveils second gen 10″ Galaxy tab

    Samsung has launched a new version of its Galaxy Tab in major markets. It's powered by Android Honeycomb 3.1, and features a 10.1-inch touchscreen display rather than the seven-inch display for the previous model. Full specs at Samsung's site here. Samsung pegs it as the world's thinnest tablet, measuring 8.6 millimetres, and will cost around $630. The Korean manufacturer said the seven-inch tab was optimised for portability, while the Galaxy Tab 10.1 was best suited for multimedia consumption and web browsing. "It is very thin... and weighs just as much as a cup of takeout coffee," said Samsung. The company is currently embroiled...

  • App of the week: Molenotes

    This week I take a look at Molenotes, a note-taking app that recreates the feeling of writing in actual notebooks with limited pages on your iPhone. I will come right out and say it, when I first heard about Moleskine notebooks and how much they cost, I was appalled. I mean come on now, why would you want to pay that much for a notebook that’s only differentiating factor from the standard Croxley 180-page classic that we all used at school is a little pocket in the back cover for storing random notes. But one day I saw them...

  • Very long and semi compact: the Olympus SP-610UZ

    Review: Eleven years ago, my parents bought their first digital camera. It was an Olympus with 1.2 megapixels, less than the average cellphone’s front-facing camera nowadays, although perhaps the vastly better lens counts for something. Times have changed, pixel counts have gone up, but somehow that old camera still looks and feels like the brand new Olympus SP-610UZ. A decade on and this compact superzoom has piles more features, but surprisingly many of my criticism of the old model remain. Where it’s strongest What this latest in Olympus “big-compacts” line gets right is good price-performance balance. It’s not very expensive at around...

  • Video Review: Toshiba STOR.E TV+

    The Stor.E TV+ is an external drive slash media centre. It’s clumsily named, clumsily built, and clumsily supported. So at least Toshiba is consistent there. It would make a great story device for a Dilbert special – the grubby fingerprints of corporate politics are all over it. The base engineering work is absolutely fine. It’s solidly built, well specced, with some nice features. What is not fine is the user interface, the attention to detail, and the user interface. Roger Hislop takes a look.

  • Textbooks now for rent on Kindle

    Amazon.com has begun letting students rent textbooks on Kindle electronic readers. Kindle Textbook Rentals lets students pay based on how long they want to use textbooks, with periods ranging from 30 days to 360 days. Renting a digital version of textbooks on a Kindle for a month can save students as much as 80 percent of the price of buying the works, according to Amazon Kindle vice president Dave Limp. "Students tell us that they enjoy the low prices we offer on new and used print textbooks," Limp said. "Now we're excited to offer students an option to rent Kindle textbooks...

  • Infamous 2: Do good guys come first?

    Review: The first inFamous for PS3 was a great showcase for the power of the PS3 that showed off the machines capabilities brilliantly. Beyond that, it was also a good game in its own right, with tight gameplay and a reasonably good story. The inevitable follow-up could easily have been a cut and paste job and still be considered a good game. Thankfully the development house, Sucker Punch, doesn’t roll that way. When they make a sequel they make sure it’s better, as can be seen with their wholly under-appreciated Sly Cooper series. Taking all the originals goodness and...