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  • App of the Week — PressReader

    This week, we look at PressReader, a dandy little offline newspaper reader available not only for iPhone, but practically every platform under the sun. For my purposes, I tested it first on the iPhone, then the iPad. Despite the blisteringly clear screen of the iPhone 4S, magazine content seems trapped on the tiny screen. On the iPad however, the app opens up the user to a world of offline and online content. Let's get into into. The every-man eReader The issue of reading magazines on any digital format is that the scanned in pages rarely take advantage of the medium they reside...

  • Kenyan Ultrabooks splash-down care of Intel

    Kenya will be the lucky recipient of reasonably priced Intel Ultrabooks, made especially for the emerging market. Earlier this week, Intel launched six Ultrabooks for the eager Kenyan market, ranging from Kshs 60 000 (US$725) to 90 000 (US$1087). Danie Steyn, Intel East African General Manager says the new laptops are “an evolution”: “Ultrabook devices represent the next step in the evolution of the PC. There is a hunger for a device that can act like a tablet, but that allows for a full computing experience -- this is exactly what Ultrabook devices deliver.” Steyn hopes that the Ultrabooks will deliver an alternative to...

  • Surprise! Nokia TV enters the fray

    Nokia TV was bound to happen and according to this leak, TV services are due for release on the company's range of Lumia phones. With Nokia TV, users can view local video broadcasts and the first country to receive this blessed gift will be the home of Nokia itself, Finland. Channels included in the launch will be Nelopen, MTV3 and YLE, the oldest television channel in Finland. The report says that the TV channels will only be available on a Wi-Fi connection, which makes sense given the heavy speech and video requirements intrinsically linked with TV streaming. Let’s get to the...

  • Review — Verbatim Bluetooth Audio Cube

    Verbatim’s Bluetooth Audio Cube is utter tosh. It’s too bulky, the buttons are too fiddly and it needs 4 AA batteries to run if you want a cord free music experience. But, it sounds decent. Stuff the positives. Let’s tear it apart I say. Boxy sound For roughly US$35, the Audio Cube pumps out 2 Watts of pure portable power. Whether corded, connected to your laptop or mobile phone via the A2DP Bluetooth standards, the Audio Cube smoothly rubs out audio, pumps bass and generally behaves rather well, that is until you max the sound out. Trouble rears its head on maximum...

  • Ubi-Camera: Turn your hands into the viewfinder

    The Ubi-Camera is new, but it seems familiar the moment you see it. The ad hoc viewfinder is a throwback to the classic pose you’ve seen film directors strike to frame shots and it also bears semblance to the work done by Pranav Mistry on the Sixth Sense project. The prototype device by researchers at Japan's Institute of Advanced Media Arts and Sciences is an experiment in designing a miniature camera without skimping on the viewfinder. There’s no LCD, instead, you slip the tiny camera onto your index finger, frame a shot with your L-framed hands and adjust the focus...

  • Indie darling Fez drops onto XBLA 13 April

    We've harped on about Fez before on Gearburn. Simply put, it's one of the most exciting independent games ever made. On 13 April, Fez will launch on Xbox Live (XBLA) for the price of 800 Microsoft Points, or US$10. No other platforms have been considered, for now. Fez is all about the Zen-like trip through three-dimensions. The adorable pixel art plays to the strengths of Fez, letting the player rotate the 2D world on a 3D axis to solve intricate puzzles. For well over five years, Fez has been locked inside development hell. Announced in April 2007, it is...

  • Review — Parrot Minikit+

    The Parrot Minikit+ is the Bluetooth, hands-free kit you've always wanted, but never knew you needed. Confused? So am I. Talking on your mobile while driving is illegal in some countries, so it makes a modicum of sense to employ a hands-free kit. Some use the voice-free option on their phones, shouting loudly into a tiny speaker as they drive. Other less fashionable drivers use the headphones which come standard with their mobile. But I roll with a different, tech-infused crowd and prefer to embrace the future, yo. Parrot style The look and feel of the Minikit+ is stellar. The device is...

  • Mozilla shows off HTML 5, other new tech with MMORPG

    Mozilla, in cooperation with French developer Little Workshop, launched a new MMORPG called BrowserQuest today to demonstrate what developers can do with HTML5, WebSocket, Canvas and other advanced web technologies, including Node.js. The game, which is actually quite fun in its own right, should work with virtually every modern desktop browser (except for Internet Explorer), as well as Safari on iOS and Firefox on Android. The mobile version is, in Mozilla's words, "more experimental," but should be seen as "an early glimpse of what kind of games will be coming to the mobile Web in the future." The one technology...

  • Lumia 800 heads to China, renamed 800C

    People of China, Nokia's Windows Phone the Lumia 800 is primed for arrival, and it's been renamed the Lumia 800C. While knock-offs of the famed Windows Phone have been doing the rounds, nothing tastes better than official. China Telcoms today lifted the veil on the Lumia 800C (available in cyan or black), saying that the phone plans to launch later next month. When the 800C finally arrives, the app store will be ready, with 20 000 apps available on launch date. The price? A cool 3599 Chinese yuans, or US$570. This is the world's largest mobile phone market and with...

  • Hands on with the Samsung Galaxy Beam

    When I first read about the Samsung Galaxy Beam, I was incredibly excited. A phone, with a built-in projector. Too cool. Naturally I leaped at the chance to get hands on with it. To understand why I was excited, you have to understand that one of my favourite ever TED talks is by Pranav Mistry and involves him demonstrating Sixth Sense, a device that combines motion sensor technology with a wearable projector and pint sized computing. When I first watched Mistry’s talk, I thought it was the future of personal computing. A couple of hundred articles and some hard...