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  • E3 Expo 2011: all you need to know

    Geeks and tech enthusiasts the world over have been wetting their pants over the past week as announcements, demos and industry revelations streamed in from the Electronic Entertainment Expo - the annual conference showcasing the best innovations from the world’s top entertainment powerhouses. Three names: Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo. Story by Nick Frost There is a wealth of live feeds and on -the-spot coverage to be found on the E3 event. Too much to condense all of it into one digestible reading. That would be ludicrous. However, there was a glitzfest of cutting-edge shockers and mmm shiny eye-candy, there were a...

  • Kinect SDK unleashed so users can gesture at PCs

    Microsoft began letting software developers imbue computers with voice and motion-sensing technology from its Kinect controller for the Xbox 360 videogame console. A free Kinect for Windows Software Development Kit opens doors for computer programs enhanced with depth-perception, voice recognition, or gesture controls using the popular console accessory. "We are looking at taking the Kinect out of the game space a bit and putting it in other spaces," said Halimat Alabi, a developer who attended a 24-hour Kinect coding marathon at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Washington. The kit was available for download at research.microsoft.com/kinectsdk. The Redmond company last week added YouTube, voice commands,...

  • Brinkmanship

    Review – Brink (Xbox360, PS3, PC) *Sigh* I really, really wanted to like Brink. For realsies and everything. But Brink makes it so hard. On the surface everything seems so perfect, but the more you play, the more things you find to dislike. And the things you do like somehow becomes less likable. Brink comes from Slash Damage, the same people that brought us Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory and Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, both excellent online shooters from 2003 and 2007. Both games were class-based and objective focused, which basically meant that combat between teams tended to be concentrated on very...

  • App of the week: Reeder

    This week’s app of the week: Reeder, a Google Reader client for iPhone that is beautifully designed, easy to use and powerful enough to keep up with all the latest headlines that your favourite websites throw at it. In real time. I’m a big fan of online content, I love how information and news can be spread like wildfire all over the ’Net, and that you can read it, comprehend it and spread it as quickly as it takes you to sip your morning coffee. My problem lies in the fact that there is just so much content online that...

  • Gentlemen, start your console’s engines

    It seems Nintendo's reveal of its new Wii U has started a videogames arms race similar to the one started with the original Wii. Allowing the use of dual-screen games with touch-based controls, the Wii U has inspired both Apple and Sony game designers to explore similar concepts. Apple's recently announced update to their mobile operating platform, iOS5, contains a major new feature called AirPlay Mirroring. This new feature will allow an iPad and an AppleTV system to pair up with each other. The AppleTV would then display a game to a TV, while the iPad act as a controller,...

  • Video Review: Samsung Galaxy S II

    Samsung scored a smash hit with the Galaxy S, a phone that almost single-handedly established it (along with Android) as a viable threat to the iPhone hegemony on big, flat, beautiful, minimalist, keyboardless smartphones. Time passed, other phones came, Samsung got back to work. And now, ladies and gentlemen, live and in the plastic, the Galaxy S II. Roger Hislop reviews the Galaxy S II.

  • BB Bold still the messaging king

    Review: BlackBerry Bold 9780. This is the best BlackBerry you can buy today. But should you buy it? BlackBerry fans looking for a high-end BlackBerry experience have a choice between the 9780 and the Torch 9800, and there's a third contender on the horizon that might steal your heart. The 9780 has amazing strengths, but maybe not the ones you're looking for. The handset itself is handsomely austere. Understated and almost completely black, the 9780 is the most likely weapon of choice for Wall Street types. The build quality, light weight - and of course the fact that it comes...

  • Rockstar gets brooding and intense with LA Noire

    Review: LA Noire - Detective Phelps cuts a sharp figure in the neon light of Los Angeles. Hunched over the scene of a brutal crime, he pensively inspects each inch of a rusted pipe, stained with the blood of an unknown assailant. Music swells in the background, the crime scene has now been swept for clues. Detective Phelps knows that it is time to move on to the interrogation of the witness. Leaning against a ruby-red barstool, she draws back on a cigarette, looks in the detectives direction and casually blows smoke into his face. With uncannily realistic facial movement,...

  • Nokia wins patent skirmish – iPhone buyers pay royalties

    "We are very pleased to have Apple join the growing number of Nokia licensees": Nokia chief executive Stephen Elop. Nokia, still the world's leading mobile phone maker, stated that its competitor Apple had agreed to pay royalties for using Nokia technology in its devices. This will end all of the related ongoing patent disputes. "The financial structure of the agreement consists of a one-time payment payable by Apple and on-going royalties to be paid by Apple to Nokia for the term of the agreement," Nokia said in a statement. The Finnish mobile phone giant said details of the contract were confidential. In...

  • Samsung Galaxy S II: The galaxy strikes back

    Samsung scored a smash hit with the Galaxy S, a phone that almost single-handedly established it (along with Android) as a viable threat to the iPhone hegemony on big, flat, beautiful, minimalist, keyboardless smartphones. Time passed, other phones came, Samsung got back to work. And now, ladies and gentlemen, live and in the plastic, the Galaxy S II. I had lunch with a friend yesterday. She has a Galaxy S. “Oh, you have the new one,” she said a little dismissively. An IT pro, she’s been up and down the tech block, round and round the upgrade carousel. "Whatever," her...